PLAIN YARN: LAMB--What will you make?

 Plain Yarn is organic, undyed, local Romney Wool

Plain Yarn is organic, undyed, local Romney Wool

Still trying to decide what you might do with Plain Yarn: Lamb from Lancaster, Pennsylvania?  We have some ideas!  We have two natural, un-dyed colors in stock this spring--a beautiful deep brown, and unbleached natural white. 

 Felt Flock by Bev Galeskas knit by edirks on Ravelry

Felt Flock by Bev Galeskas knit by edirks on Ravelry

It is always a privilege to see what knitters and crocheters make with yarns from LYS--and we are impressed and thrilled with the creativity we've seen when it comes to Plain Yarn! We can't wait to see what you've made, and we'd love to hear what you're planning to make with this beautiful yarn.  Post your projects on Ravelry, or send us a photo!





We fell in love with Erica Dirks' projects using the "Felted Flock" pattern by Bev Galeska.  We wrote our own pattern for a warm, comfortable hat called the 'Shepherd's Checkerboard' (which is available as a kit in the shop or on our website).  And several of us made the 'Change of Heart' cowl by Justyna Lorkowska (Knitty Deep Fall 2014), it's very pretty in natural white or brown.

Lately, I've been thinking about what would be the 'just right' project for the fingering weight lambswool skeins and I hit on the traditional Shetland Hap. Now, I can't stop thinking about them. So, I've googled and searched around on Ravelry--and it turns out there's more than one way to knit a hap! There isn't consensus on the meaning or etymology of the word 'hap,' but mostly it seems that it's Norse roots mean to 'cover, wrap, or enfold; shelter.'  In knitting it refers specifically to the Shetland Island tradition of making warm, comfortable shawls suitable for daily wear and usually featuring an old shale patterned border.

Kate Davies recently published a collection of traditional and modern takes on the knitted hap, and she is in good company. Jared Flood, Gudrun Johnston, and many more outstanding contemporary designers are giving haps a chance. Yardage for a traditional full hap ranges between 850-1,700 yards of fingering weight yarns.  A two color hap in Plain Yarn: Lamb may very well be in my knitting future!

 photo Shetland Museum & Archives

photo Shetland Museum & Archives

'Haps may well surprise you: they can be square, triangular, or hexagonal, incorporating lace, cables, or colour. Though haps are, by definition, functional, wearable textiles, you’ll find they can also be elegant and fascinating, graphic and abstract.'  --Kate Davies